Category Archives: Apache NiFi

Speeding up Apache NiFi compilation

The normal way to build Apache NiFi from source on Linux is to use:

mvn -T C2.0 clean install

More info is here incidentally. One issue with this is that it also runs all the tests which gives rise to a couple of problems. One is that some of the tests take a while and slow down the build process. The other is that, should some arcane test in code that isn’t interesting fail, the build aborts. To avoid this, build with tests turned off:

mvn -T C2.0 clean install -Dmaven.test.skip=true

Saves quite a bit of time!

rtndf – Python scripts for creating streaming data flow processing pipelines

LaplacianThe idea of joining together separate, lightweight processing elements to form complex pipelines is nothing new. DirectX and GStreamer have been doing this kind of thing for a long time. More recently, Apache NiFi has done a similar kind of thing but with Java classes. While Apache NiFi does have a lot of nice features, I really don’t want to live in Java hell.
I have been playing with MQTT for some time now and it is a very easy to use publish/subscribe system that’s used in all kinds of places. Seemed like it could be the glue for something…

So that’s really the background for rtnDataFlow or rtndf as it is now called. It currently uses MQTT as its pub/sub infrastructure but there’s nothing too specific there – MQTT could easily be swapped out for something else if required. The repo consists of a number of pipeline processing elements that can be used to do some (hopefully) useful things. The primary language is Python although there’s nothing stopping anything being used provided it has an MQTT client and handles the JSON messages correctly. It will even be able to include pipeline processing elements in Docker containers. This will make deployment of new, complex, pipeline processing elements very simple.

The pipeline processing elements are all joined up using topics. Pipeline processing elements can publish to one or more topics and/or subscribe to one or more topics. Because pub/sub systems are intrinsically multicasting, it’s very easy to process data in multiple ways in parallel (for redundancy, performance or functionality). MQTT also allows pipeline processing elements to be distributed on multiple systems, allowing load sharing and heterogeneous computing systems (where only some machines might be fitted with GPUs for example).

Obviously, tools are required to design the pipelines and also to manage them at runtime. The design aspect will come from an old code generation project. While that actually generates C and Python code from a design that the user inputs via a graphical interface, the rtnDataFlow version will just make sure all topic names and broker addresses line up correctly and then produce a pipeline configuration file. A special app, rtnFlowControl, will run on each system and will be responsible for implementing the pipeline design specified.

So what’s the point of all of this? I’m tired of writing (or reworking) code multiple times for slightly different applications. My goal is to keep the pipeline processing elements simple enough and tightly focused so that the specific application can be achieved by just wiring together pipeline processing elements. There’ll end up being quite a few of these of course and probably most applications will still need custom elements but it’s better than nothing. My initial use of rtnDataFlow will be to assist with experiments to see how machine learning tools can be used with IoT devices to do interesting things.

Less completely insane Apache NiFi graph

LessCrazyNiFiThis one looks quite a bit nicer than my previous attempt at this design! The functionality is the same but now a lot of the heavier processing has been moved into a new infrastructure that’s been developed to integrate artificial intelligence and machine learning functions into data flows very efficiently. Now I am able to leverage Apache NiFi‘s extensive range of processors to interface to all kinds of things but also escape the JVM environment to get bare metal performance for the higher level functions including access to GPUs and things like that. In this design I am just using NiFi’s MQTT and Elasticsearch processors but it could just as easily fire processed data into HDFS, Kafka etc.

Apache NiFi Flow Data Provenance

Provenance1As I am beginning to realize, the data provenance features of Apache NiFi are incredibly useful, especially to visualize what the data flows look like and how they are being processed. The millisecond resolution timestamp also gives a feel for what delays there might have been along the way.

Provenance2

The screen capture above shows the contents of the FlowFile highlighted in yellow on the first screen capture. This is a fantastic feature for debugging problems – it even displays jpeg format data as an image if you want.

Using Apache NiFi with Apache Kafka

NiFiKafkaApache NiFi is a great way of capturing and processing streams while Apache Kafka is a great way of storing stream data. There’s an excellent description here of how to configure NiFi to pass data to Kafka using MovieLens data as its source. Since I am not running HDFS I modified the example to just put the movies and tags data into Kafka and save the ratings data to a local file. Trying to stash the ratings data into Kafka doesn’t work – there is just too much of it too fast and buffers overflow. It’s pretty easy to use the Kafka console consumer to check that the data is being stored for the movies and tags topics and the local ratings.dat file will be generated also.

Setting up for custom NiFi processor development

NiFiCurrently working with Apache NiFi and I need to put together a custom processor. There are a number of moving parts to getting an Ubuntu system set up for this, hence this aide memoire as otherwise I’ll never be able to do it again! I don’t know if this is the most efficient or even the most correct but it did at least work for me.

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