Telepresent Enhanced Reality (TER)

Following on from an earlier post on Enhanced Reality, it occurred to me that separating the stereo cameras (and microphones) from the ER headset creates a new way of achieving telepresent remote participation – Telepresent Enhanced Reality or TER. I was actually trying out a simpler version a while back when I had a camera on a pan/tilt platform slaved to an Oculus DK2 VR headset. A real TER setup would require stereo cameras and multiple microphones on a pan/tilt/roll mount. The user would have a VR headset and the pose of the pan/tilt/roll mount would mirror movements of the user’s head.

An interesting use would be for conferences where some of the participants are in a conventional conference room but wearing AR/MR/ER headsets (eg HoloLens). Positions in the room for the remote participants would each have a stereo camera/microphone remote. The local participants would obviously be able to see each other but instead of the camera/microphone hardware, they would see avatars representing the remote users. These avatars could be as sophisticated or as simple as desired. Remote participants would see (via the stereo cameras) the conference room and local participants and would also see the remote participant avatars which replace the physical camera/microphone hardware at those locations. Alternatively, these could be suitably equipped telepresence robots (or even cameras mounted on small drones) which would also allow movement around the room. Really anything that has the essential hardware (stereo cameras, microphones, pan/tilt/roll capability) could be used.

Given that everyone has AR/MR capability in this setup, something like a conventional projected presentation could still be done except that the whole thing would be virtual – a virtual screen would be placed on a suitable wall and everyone could look at it. Interaction could be with simulated laser pointers and the like. Equally, every position could have its own simulated monitor that displays the presentation. Virtual objects visible to everyone could be placed on the table (or somewhere in the room) for discussion, annotation or modification.

Obviously everyone could be remote and use a VR headset and everything could then be virtual with no need for hardware. However, the scheme described preserves some of the advantages of real meetings while at the same time allowing remote participants to feel like they are really there too.

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